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quality posts: 17 Private Messages WootBot

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Yamaha 7.2-channel Network AV Receiver

Last Purchase:
a month ago
Order Pace (rank):
Top 6% of Electronics Woots
Top 11% of all Woots
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Top 6% of all Woots

barney490


quality posts: 1 Private Messages barney490

80w for 2 channels? What about with surround and center channel.

virtual1one


quality posts: 10 Private Messages virtual1one
barney490 wrote:80w for 2 channels? What about with surround and center channel.



the 80w is referring to total continuous amplifier output across all channels. Power is usually highest at left and right, okay at center, and the rest of the surround system is low power. So you'd be advised to have 100w L/R, around 60w center, and maybe 20w all around the surrounds. Speaker sets are sold with this in mind.

texdrum


quality posts: 1 Private Messages texdrum

That 80w specification is with 2 channels running.

As you add channels (2, 5, 7), that number will drop equally across all the channels being driven (because they are all being driven by the same power supply, which is the limiting factor).

80 watts (and lower in surround modes) doesn't sound like much, but it's plenty for most. The exceptions would be larger rooms, and/or inefficient speakers.

Also, Yamaha tends to rate their receivers on the more conservative side. At one time, manufacturers were able to basically make up power ratings, but newer regulations have changed that (but some still seem to fudge things a bit more, Yamaha not being one of them).

For a basic Atmos receiver, this should do pretty well.



modfalk


quality posts: 2 Private Messages modfalk

Looks like it works with Echo devices also.
https://hub.yamaha.com/how-to-use-alexa-with-musiccast/

carbsnine


quality posts: 0 Private Messages carbsnine

Anyone know if you can run over the air antenna coax through this receiver?

Jonathan Carbajal

brentano


quality posts: 0 Private Messages brentano

Will it accept input from a turntable? None of those inputs are labeled "phono," so I'm not sure if this will amplify a turntable adequately without a separate pre-amp.

atetra


quality posts: 4 Private Messages atetra
brentano wrote:Will it accept input from a turntable? None of those inputs are labeled "phono," so I'm not sure if this will amplify a turntable adequately without a separate pre-amp.



No phono preamp in this model. So you will need to add an external one. Here's one for short $$ at the mothership.

Quality Post? What's a Quality Post??

rx8doc


quality posts: 1 Private Messages rx8doc
carbsnine wrote:Anyone know if you can run over the air antenna coax through this receiver?



Yes but you will need a drill

Speedogomer


quality posts: 1 Private Messages Speedogomer
virtual1one wrote:the 80w is referring to total continuous amplifier output across all channels. Power is usually highest at left and right, okay at center, and the rest of the surround system is low power. So you'd be advised to have 100w L/R, around 60w center, and maybe 20w all around the surrounds. Speaker sets are sold with this in mind.



That number is also with 8ohm speakers. Using 6ohm speakers the output would be higher. Using 4ohm speakers it would be even higher yet, although most receivers at this price point have trouble driving 4ohm speakers, and then can be overheating issues. Because I run 4ohm speakers, I had to be sure my AVR was rated for it.

I would check the impedance rating of the speakers you plan to use.

For moderate listening volumes, 80 watts will put out plenty of sound.

technosavant


quality posts: 10 Private Messages technosavant
carbsnine wrote:Anyone know if you can run over the air antenna coax through this receiver?



You'd run that directly to the TV and run an audio line back to the receiver. The audio might even be able to run via the HDMI since it has support for HDMI's Audio Return Channel, so you wouldn't even need a separate cable for it.

rowdyred94


quality posts: 5 Private Messages rowdyred94

I'm considering upgrading my nice-but-old Onkyo 838 in anticipation of upgrading my nice-but-old Samsung DLP to an HDR LCD TV. I'd be routing HDMI through it to the TV from multiple sources (Roku, older game consoles, Chromecast, DVD player). What gotchas should I be looking for that might leave me disappointed with this unit as a modern A/V hub?

Wooting gleefully since 2008

rowdyred94


quality posts: 5 Private Messages rowdyred94

Possibly a good resource - Looks like it was originally a $400 unit as the Costco equivalent to the $500 RX-V581.

Wooting gleefully since 2008

Speedogomer


quality posts: 1 Private Messages Speedogomer
rowdyred94 wrote:I'm considering upgrading my nice-but-old Onkyo 838 in anticipation of upgrading my nice-but-old Samsung DLP to an HDR LCD TV. I'd be routing HDMI through it to the TV from multiple sources (Roku, older game consoles, Chromecast, DVD player). What gotchas should I be looking for that might leave me disappointed with this unit as a modern A/V hub?



Downsides of this unit, for me, would be the relatively low power output, lack of support for 4 ohm speakers, and too few hdmi/optical inputs.

On the plus side, this is about as cheap as it gets for a 7.1 Atmos receiver. Yamaha has a pretty good reputation for building nice AVRs.

What speakers do you plan to use? They may be the weak link in the chain once you upgrade the AVR.

Edit: I looked up the Onkyo 838... it's not that old of a unit, and significantly more high end than this Yamaha. With the exception of hdcp 2.2 support, you wouldn't be gaining anything.

rowdyred94


quality posts: 5 Private Messages rowdyred94
Speedogomer wrote:What speakers do you plan to use? They may be the weak link in the chain once you upgrade the AVR.

Edit: I looked up the Onkyo 838... it's not that old of a unit, and significantly more high end than this Yamaha. With the exception of hdcp 2.2 support, you wouldn't be gaining anything.



I have a set of Klipsch floor speakers that don't fit my new rec room, so it's just a Klipsch surround (satellite) set with a moderately good center and an self-powered sub.

Not that 838. I bought this one in about 1996. It's been a great unit but obviously doesn't do HDMI.

Wooting gleefully since 2008

bmfb1980


quality posts: 0 Private Messages bmfb1980

There was a similar receiver here on Woot about a month ago and it had a lot of buzz. Some relevant points from that discussion:

ATMOS... just because it decodes the signal... doesn't mean with 7.1 you are going to hear it. Normally with 7.1 you are adding 2 "side" speakers to your 5.1 setup (i.e. Center/L/R/L-rear/R-rear BECOMES center, L/R, L/R-rear, L/R-surround-sides). Most sounds will require these positions to sound natural. Now with ATMOS, you are supposed to ADD 2 CEILING speakers, so your 7.1 should now become 9.1... I don't care what the marketing people are telling you, they are LYING if 7.1 is going to sound like ATMOS is supposed to!!! So this "7.1" is really just "5.1 with ceiling speaker decoding"... the loss of your side/surround speakers will be staggering as more sound comes from these than ever will come from ceiling speakers. be forewarned

Also, when you use any of the other features (zones, multi-room, etc) be aware that you are GIVING UP the ATMOS SIGNAL. Most units require a separate/additional power source for these extra channels and they get around that by usurping the ATMOS channels!

So unless you will never have any more income, or cannot save any more than the price of this amp, I highly recommend waiting and saving your $$$ for an amp that will truly deliver ATMOS sound (when you add 2 ceiling speakers to your 7.1 that is).

So only buy an ATMOS receiver if it is 9.1 or 9.2!!!! Otherwise it's like using your fancy 4K/HD player to watch on a 720 resolution screen! That's the video equivalent when you subtract the side speakers for a cheap "atmos" receiver!

One last ATMOS recommendation: Don't waste $$$ on those "atmos" speakers that "project" the sound upward from your fronts. *Horrible* sound and nothing like true ceiling speakers.

Here's an example of what to look for in a true ATMOS receiver: Sony STR-ZA5000ES. If you can't find one cheap... just forget about ATMOS anyway because really now... are you planning on hanging 2 new speakers on your ceiling? You don't need ATMOS processing. (And not like there are many movies at all using the ATMOS channel either at this point)

GTTraveller


quality posts: 13 Private Messages GTTraveller
rowdyred94 wrote:...

Not that 838. I bought this one in about 1996. It's been a great unit but obviously doesn't do HDMI.



22 years is nice ... Technics I bought a few years ago crapped out already. )c:

Speedogomer


quality posts: 1 Private Messages Speedogomer
bmfb1980 wrote:There was a similar receiver here on Woot about a month ago and it had a lot of buzz. Some relevant points from that discussion:

ATMOS... just because it decodes the signal... doesn't mean with 7.1 you are going to hear it. Normally with 7.1 you are adding 2 "side" speakers to your 5.1 setup (i.e. Center/L/R/L-rear/R-rear BECOMES center, L/R, L/R-rear, L/R-surround-sides). Most sounds will require these positions to sound natural. Now with ATMOS, you are supposed to ADD 2 CEILING speakers, so your 7.1 should now become 9.1... I don't care what the marketing people are telling you, they are LYING if 7.1 is going to sound like ATMOS is supposed to!!! So this "7.1" is really just "5.1 with ceiling speaker decoding"... the loss of your side/surround speakers will be staggering as more sound comes from these than ever will come from ceiling speakers. be forewarned

Also, when you use any of the other features (zones, multi-room, etc) be aware that you are GIVING UP the ATMOS SIGNAL. Most units require a separate/additional power source for these extra channels and they get around that by usurping the ATMOS channels!

So unless you will never have any more income, or cannot save any more than the price of this amp, I highly recommend waiting and saving your $$$ for an amp that will truly deliver ATMOS sound (when you add 2 ceiling speakers to your 7.1 that is).

So only buy an ATMOS receiver if it is 9.1 or 9.2!!!! Otherwise it's like using your fancy 4K/HD player to watch on a 720 resolution screen! That's the video equivalent when you subtract the side speakers for a cheap "atmos" receiver!

One last ATMOS recommendation: Don't waste $$$ on those "atmos" speakers that "project" the sound upward from your fronts. *Horrible* sound and nothing like true ceiling speakers.

Here's an example of what to look for in a true ATMOS receiver: Sony STR-ZA5000ES. If you can't find one cheap... just forget about ATMOS anyway because really now... are you planning on hanging 2 new speakers on your ceiling? You don't need ATMOS processing. (And not like there are many movies at all using the ATMOS channel either at this point)



Except the absolute cheapest 9 channel amp is going to be 3 times as expensive as this.

Also, many people (my self included) do not have a listening space that allows rear channels in a 7.1 setup. If your listening position is against a wall, there is nowhere for those rear channels to go.

Your argument is that atmos should be 9.1, you're forgetting that atmos is considered 5.2.2, not 7.1, also atmos in a 9 channel set up is considered 7.2.2

The atmos setup gives you the option to put ceiling speakers, or up firing add on speakers. With many 7.1 receivers you can also do front high speakers instead of ceiling speakers.

7.1 gives you options. Even for soundtracks that dont include atmos, you can run the receiver as 5.1 no problem.

Also, you're forgetting that you can use this receiver to do a standard 7.1 setup. You dont ever have to use Atmos if you dont want to, and you're not paying any extra for it since basically every new reciever can decode atmos.

I'm not really sure what point you're trying to make.

AtomicInternet


quality posts: 0 Private Messages AtomicInternet
rx8doc wrote:Yes but you will need a drill



I feel this response was not appreciated. I wanted to give you 500 points and assure you it did not go over my head.

AtomicInternet


quality posts: 0 Private Messages AtomicInternet

The Dolby Atmos site has exactly what you need to understand the speaker arrangements. I had an existing 5.1 speaker setup and went with the 5.1.2 option (minimum recommended). It's technically 3 front / 2 surround for the first "5", then "1" for the sub and "2" for ceiling. The spec goes up to 9.2.4 but I personally have no interest in that many speakers, nor an understanding how 2 subs is an advantage. This particular amp only supports 7 amped speakers with two sub pre-outs, so you can do up to 7.2 classic surround, or 5.2.2 Atmos.
https://www.dolby.com/us/en/guide/dolby-atmos-speaker-setup/5-1-2-setups.html