gak0090


quality posts: 84 Private Messages gak0090
shaneberto wrote:Will this enable my 11 year old non digital signal capable tv to receive digital signal? I never bought the box when the switchover happened because I had cable. I've since cancelled cable. I have an antenna but no box for the signal. If this meets my needs I'll be stoked.



This is $40 http://www.walmart.com/ip/17350647?adid=22222222227014419715&wmlspartner=wlpa&wl0=&wl1=g&wl2=&wl3=14074211590&wl4=&wl5=pla&veh=sem your easiest solution. The product today requires that you have that television networked, and in your case you would require a computer attached to the TV and use the mediacenter as your tuner. I don't think you probably want to go to that hassle (unless you want to set-up a DVR type deal with a computer).

valarin


quality posts: 0 Private Messages valarin
jeraden wrote:Anyone that has the Prime with FIOS - can you get AMC-HD on it? I've had it for several months, and think it's great overall. But it won't tune to AMC-HD - just wondering if anyone else ran into that and if there was a way to fix it.

edit: nm, I just looked on the silicondust forums and there is an updated firmware to fix this issue, will have to try that tonight.




No this does not work with FIOS. FIOS/Uverse are IPTV. They actually send the tv signal out encrypted over an "internet" connection. This device takes a cable signal and then turns it into what amounts to IPTV on your local PC.

hardaker


quality posts: 1 Private Messages hardaker

It is worth noting that with comcast in the US, they're discontinuing support for hooking cable directly to boxes like this without a cablecard. A number of months ago, my HDHR and TVs stopped receiving two local channels from comcast. Upon calling comcast I was informed "We're banning support for connecting a cable directly to your TV without a set top box" (their words... don't ya love "banning" from a customer service rep?) Anyway, they refused to fix the problem so I have now switched to OTA, which works wonderfully. But the important take away is that if you're going to use it with comcast, get the prime version of this box.

boy914


quality posts: 0 Private Messages boy914
Pufferfishy wrote:Two questions:

1) Does it work with FiOS?
- it has a cable card slot, so I assume it does, just not for PPV

2) Can you EDIT what it records? i.e. remove the commercials.
I guess what I'm wondering is does it record in some standard simple format (MP4, MJPEG, etc) or something nearly impossible to work with like AC3



For #2: You'll need separate software to record the channels, this just has the software to handle the tuning for live viewing. I use the Dual with NextPVR (aka NPVR) and it works great. There are tutorials online for configuring NPVR to work with a tool like comskip that will mark commercial breaks in a chapter file, and then other software to use the chapter file to remove the commercials.

shortbus2


quality posts: 3 Private Messages shortbus2
Pufferfishy wrote:Two questions:
2) Can you EDIT what it records? i.e. remove the commercials.
I guess what I'm wondering is does it record in some standard simple format (MP4, MJPEG, etc) or something nearly impossible to work with like AC3

This device doesn't record anything. This is purely the hardware to get the signal and get it onto the network. You must run 3rd party software on a computer somewhere to record it like Media Center, SageTV, or a handful of others.

However once you do get that 3rd party software, yes it is standard formats that can be imported, edited, and/or converted to just about any video format you want. I "think" a standard OTA digital stream is written to disk as MPEG-2? Can't remember exactly which format is used, but for the most part the stream is written in the native format direct to disk.

For those looking to run this over WiFi? You must have N capable devices for that to work reliably. A standard HD OTA stream is 14-20Mbps depending on the audio and video encoding. A WiFi network running G (54Mbps) in perfect conditions tops out around 22Mbps of actual throughput. My laptop could not smoothly play most streams until I upgraded to a N150 router.

bluvision


quality posts: 0 Private Messages bluvision
Edbert wrote:That killed the buy for me, I have gig-E in the room with the TV (currently used by the 802.11 box behind the Cisco-ASA which is behind the U-Verse box) but at opposite ends of the room. If this box could inject the stream via WiFi I'd buy it.



Use an xbox 360 for wifi. It's preferable to have wired, but you could have the 360 sync to your computer running WMC and then have the 360 act as an extender.

tfmiller


quality posts: 0 Private Messages tfmiller

I purchased the HDHomeRun dual-tuner on Woot earlier this year. It was a snap to install under MythTV.

MythTV has the ability to simultaneously record multiple sub-channels on the same RF carrier from a single tuner. I set both of my tuners to allow recording up to four sub-channels. This gives me up to eight tuners for OTA recording with a single HDHomeRun.

One can also view live TV on the HDHomeRun using the cross-platform VLC player. It works quite well under Linux and Windows and should work under a Mac.

For all of you Linux fans, Silicon Dust, is a very Linux-friendly company. They provide basically everything needed to use their equipment with Linux. I wish more companies were like this...

I should also add that streaming raw 1080i video over 802.11g with the HDHomeRun did not work well for me. However, it worked fine with 480i video. YMMV.

Tim

zxinfinity


quality posts: 18 Private Messages zxinfinity

I've gone through the whole Cable Card fiasco with Time Warner Cable in Dallas, because my TV has a built in Cable Card slot. The problem with my TV is that it's not built to be able to decrypt encrypted channels because those channels are not broadcast. Rather, the Cable Card-equipped device must be capable of SENDING a signal to request the channel before it is able to decrypt. Do either of these devices do this?

My cable box costs $8-9/mo to rent, where as the Cable Card costs $2/mo to rent. After 14-15 months, the Prime could be paid off.

Could this thing also stream over WAN? Anyone have experience with using this device in conjunction with a Slingbox?

bluemaple


quality posts: 77 Private Messages bluemaple

Edbert wrote:
That killed the buy for me, I have gig-E in the room with the TV (currently used by the 802.11 box behind the Cisco-ASA which is behind the U-Verse box) but at opposite ends of the room. If this box could inject the stream via WiFi I'd buy it.

hyperz69 wrote:I works FINE over WiFi, however you must have between 15-20 mbit of actual bandwidth. Anything less and it's not going to work right (if at all). So if you have the router near by, a 150-300 mbit N setup (something with Gbe ports), then this will work over wifi. Yes it will work over G, however G maxes at 54 mbit and unless you live in the country your likely not getting anything NEAR that.



Edbert's real issue might be UVerse TV - which apparently is not compatible with this box since both UVerse and this box use proprietary and incompatible TV over IP.

farr6252


quality posts: 0 Private Messages farr6252

Does this have a hardware MPEG-2 encoder? I am just wondering what type of load this places on the computer at the other end.

samirbi


quality posts: 0 Private Messages samirbi

Be aware that the FCC recently allowed cabled companies to encrypt over-the-air broadcast channels on cable. If you are hoping to get ClearQAM channels from your cable connection (without a CableCARD) you might not have any available.

RCN in my area just sent us a letter saying all of our ClearQAM channels are going to disappear. My non-cableCARD tuner is now essentially useless.

http://www.anandtech.com/show/3570

bluemaple


quality posts: 77 Private Messages bluemaple

Very cool box - I thought I was pretty technologically alert but had not seen this before.

We can't justify cable TV for the price and get what we need from the far superior picture quality of over-the-air HD TV.

We have Magnavox hard drive DVR's ($228 ea.) and love them for pausing, time-shifting, and 'archiving' to DVD.

But this box adds the ability to do the same thing on any of our Windows 7/8 PC's - and at a reasonable price.

Key installation issue for cable or over-the-air: your cable or antenna connection must be within reach of your Internet router. (Of course if you are lucky enough to be able to get a good over-the-air signal with an interior antenna located at your router, you're all set!)

Edit: in some ways seems a bit similar to a Slingbox, but a lot cheaper.

jaimelobo


quality posts: 1 Private Messages jaimelobo

I have one of these and have been using it for a year on my network with flawless results. I have a dedicated Win7 Box connected to the TV, which functions as my primary DVR and I use it occasionally on a desktop when I want to watch TV while doing other work. I have also used it with a HP Ultrabook wirelessly (N router) and that is very cool, I take the notebook on the porch or in the kitchen and can watch TV. However, I have a pretty basic N router and the 1080 stuff can get a little jerky sometimes, especially if I am outside. I might try a better router and see what that does.

For those asking about remotes, again, this is not a DVR, it is just a tuner, you still need some software (and a computer) to actually watch TV. It does come with basic software, but you will have a much more satisfying experience with Media Center built into Windows (IMHO). If you want a remote, MCE remotes are widely available online for <$20 and they come with an IR USB receiver to plug into the computer.

I have OTA signal only and this box picks up more stations than the tuner built into the Toshiba TV.

atozzi


quality posts: 0 Private Messages atozzi
DaZoneRanger wrote:Does the three tuner version need a cable card, in order to simultaneously access three channels? I mean, can I use it to access three over the air channels at once, or is it just for 1 cable and 2 over the air channels at once? I'm definitely going to buy one of these, but I don't have cable, so if the three channel one isn't going to be of any use to me...



The cable card is only used to decrypt the signal from a cable provider, so if you're using an HD antenna you can tune three separate channels from the antenna. If you do use a cable card expect to spend a few hours on the phone with tech support because first line support doesn't know anything about these. I have Comcast and asked to escalate my call to 2nd level and got an experienced tech who actually had an HD Homerun for testing. He got me set up, but it still took over a hour with him.

wrparks


quality posts: 1 Private Messages wrparks
farr6252 wrote:Does this have a hardware MPEG-2 encoder? I am just wondering what type of load this places on the computer at the other end.



Very low load. On an older dual core CPU (4+ year old HP laptop w/ 3 GB ram. It was a low spec machine when I bought it.) I get 2-10% CPU load recording 2 channels simultaneously.

My issue tends to be network bandwidth. When it records, all other traffic on our network crawls. I'm guessing my wireless router is the bottleneck since I also use it as a wired switch. Annoying. Records beautifully but you can't reliably do anything else on the internet. Fortunately my neighbor's wifi is open

TJP740


quality posts: 1 Private Messages TJP740
farr6252 wrote:Does this have a hardware MPEG-2 encoder? I am just wondering what type of load this places on the computer at the other end.



The digital video stream coming either over the air or over the cable line is already in MPEG-2 format (ATSC standard). This box doesn't do any encoding, it just passes the MPEG stream to your computer. If you save that directly to disk, you'll have a playable MPEG-TS file.

ewindisch


quality posts: 1 Private Messages ewindisch
valarin wrote:No this does not work with FIOS. FIOS/Uverse are IPTV. They actually send the tv signal out encrypted over an "internet" connection. This device takes a cable signal and then turns it into what amounts to IPTV on your local PC.



Wrong. These devices DO work with FiOS.

Uverse is IPTV. FiOS isn't, it is delivered over optical, but is dropped into your home via a coaxial cable with a QAM signal, just like cable television. Only video-on-demand features use IPTV.

ewindisch


quality posts: 1 Private Messages ewindisch
zxinfinity wrote:Could this thing also stream over WAN? Anyone have experience with using this device in conjunction with a Slingbox?



This device passes the incoming MPEG2 stream directly onto your network. The stream is typically between 19-38mbps, which is much too high for most internet connections.

Instead, what you would want to do is send this into a PVR solution running on a computer in your home such as MythTV for transcoding (conversion). Then, you could stream it out of MythTV over the internet.

rodalpho


quality posts: 2 Private Messages rodalpho

Some people were talking about the prime and antenna-- note that the prime (the 3 tuner model) does NOT work with an antenna. It only works with digital cable and a cablecard.

Note that if you don't use windows media center you will be unable to use the HDHR prime with any channels not marked "copy freely". Which channels are marked copy freely depends on your cable company. I have time-warner which marks everything except major networks copy once.

If you do use windows media center, you're good to go. If not, you're better off buying the dual model.

Also like a previous poster said this does work with FIOS but not U-verse.

rmcypress


quality posts: 0 Private Messages rmcypress
deh5557 wrote:OK, so now this thing is my tuner and dvr. I don't watch tv sitting at the computer desk. Where is the remote? There has to be another way to change channels than the keyboard or mouse?



If your computer is connected to your TV directly, you will need a remote, keyboard or mouse. If you are using XBox360 or another media extender, you use the remote for that device. You can buy a USB Windows Media Center remote, usually for pretty cheap.

wrparks


quality posts: 1 Private Messages wrparks
rmcypress wrote:If your computer is connected to your TV directly, you will need a remote, keyboard or mouse. If you are using XBox360 or another media extender, you use the remote for that device. You can buy a USB Windows Media Center remote, usually for pretty cheap.



Or use xbox smartglass on an android/windows and soon iphone. Works great.

wildek


quality posts: 0 Private Messages wildek

Great price on the 3 tuner prime. This will pair nicely with my Ceton card so I'll have 7 tuners now. Thanks Woot!

SumDuud


quality posts: 22 Private Messages SumDuud

My cable provider (Insight Communications out of Northern Kentucky) went to requiring all tvs to be hooked up to a small box to decode the incoming signal. Directly connecting the tv to cable won't work and when I saw something about cable cards on another device like this I asked and they said they don't offer them. Is it possible to hook this up to the little decoder box and then into the PC?

Let's see the quality impulse buys!
Wooter to blame for sellout: SumDuud
Sellout time: 8:11:25 AM Central Time

Contrarian by nature.

hugehead83


quality posts: 6 Private Messages hugehead83
viviankb wrote:Can someone clarify for the non-knowledgeable?

I don't have cable. Or a TV.

If I want to watch TV on my Mac, I have to get a separate digital antenna (to get TV channels) and then get this dual tuner to make my computer able to "see" the TV channels? Is that correct?

Thanks!



Yes. Get an ATSC (over-the-air digital) antenna, and the dual tuner here. The optimal antenna for you depends mainly on geography (urban/rural). Check http://www.antennaweb.org

alextoth


quality posts: 1 Private Messages alextoth

So when this product works, it works great. The downside is that it appears to crash my router. I have an Asus RT-N66U router which is rock solid... except when when I try to use the HD HomeRun. I haven't seen it reported anywhere, but I can replicate it relatively easily. I haven't seen anything online, and not even sure whose tech support to call. I suspect it's an ASUS issue given the general bugginess of the router software.

paulw1128


quality posts: 5 Private Messages paulw1128

Hey Woot monkeys, I have a SAT question for you!

TWO is to DUAL as
THREE is to ______?

Any guesses? ;-)

wait - I did a quality post? When?!?

scragglykat


quality posts: 0 Private Messages scragglykat

It has an internal splitter. You can use it for either cable via a cable card, or cable or OTA digital broadcasts via coaxial cable input. Once the signal is inside, it is split to each of the three tuners, so you can watch one show and record two others, or record three shows while not watching.

The same goes for the two tuner one only it doesn't have a cable card slot/option and only has two tuners.

DaZoneRanger wrote:Does the three tuner version need a cable card, in order to simultaneously access three channels? I mean, can I use it to access three over the air channels at once, or is it just for 1 cable and 2 over the air channels at once? I'm definitely going to buy one of these, but I don't have cable, so if the three channel one isn't going to be of any use to me...



otaku13


quality posts: 0 Private Messages otaku13
j647 wrote:Not being a smarty pants, but does this work with a mac? Really. I didn't find any OS X software on the SiliconDust site.



its a bit of a bear to set up, and it does require a dedicated windows box to be running WMC to work, but you can get it working on Mac and even iPhone over the internet.

http://forum.xbmc.org/showthread.php?tid=119865

the instructions are mostly to set it up to work in XBMC, but it also allows you to view it in any web browser or iPad/iphone

ewindisch


quality posts: 1 Private Messages ewindisch
SumDuud wrote:My cable provider (Insight Communications out of Northern Kentucky) went to requiring all tvs to be hooked up to a small box to decode the incoming signal. Directly connecting the tv to cable won't work and when I saw something about cable cards on another device like this I asked and they said they don't offer them. Is it possible to hook this up to the little decoder box and then into the PC?



They're required by law to provide (or rent) a CableCard to you. Many references online indicate that others are using similar cablecard based systems (such as TiVo) with Insight.

You cannot connect your box to this device. For that, look instead to this Hauppauge product:

http://www.hauppauge.com/site/products/data_hdpvr.html

eckerput


quality posts: 10 Private Messages eckerput
SumDuud wrote:My cable provider (Insight Communications out of Northern Kentucky) went to requiring all tvs to be hooked up to a small box to decode the incoming signal. Directly connecting the tv to cable won't work and when I saw something about cable cards on another device like this I asked and they said they don't offer them. Is it possible to hook this up to the little decoder box and then into the PC?



I suspect you are talking about a SDV (switched digital video) box. The Prime has a USB connection so it can connect to your SDV box and use that to tune the channel. Note there is not computer in the mix, it's just your prime connected to the SDV via USB. I use SDV with my Charter setup and it works fine. I don't believe the other boxes can control a SDV box.

gtcharlie


quality posts: 6 Private Messages gtcharlie

Need a little help here. Read the whole discussion and became a little confused with conflicting recommendations. Here is my situation-- household has both Mac's and PC's and I am in the Chicago area using Comcast cable. Which of the two choices would work better for me? Two tuners is plenty if that helps. But is there something in the 3 tuner version which would be better for my particular situation? Would like to be able to use either the PC or the Mac and well as be able to view TV on my iPad (not necessarily all at the same time). Thanks.

wayneadam


quality posts: 0 Private Messages wayneadam
kenelbow wrote:To answer my own question for anybody else who is wondering, the channels received by this tuner are accessible by an Xbox 360 (or other media center extender) only through a PC running windows media center. Not a huge deal for me though, so I'm in for one.



I use this on my HTPC and on the WMC extender for an XboX in another room. Speaking from experience, use an ethernet cable. It can run on wifi if its running through your router, but it will be choppy and slow. Once I hooked it up directly to my network via ethernet cabe that my computer was hooked up to as well, it worked like a charm. I run the two tuners no problem.

Also, be aware that if you have windows 8, you no longer get WMC for free. You have to pay $10 for that app unless you have Windows 8 Pro, then you have to get a code from MS to download it for free. That program runs through January 31st, so get on it if you have Windows 8.

bryan1436


quality posts: 9 Private Messages bryan1436
gtcharlie wrote:Need a little help here. Read the whole discussion and became a little confused with conflicting recommendations. Here is my situation-- household has both Mac's and PC's and I am in the Chicago area using Comcast cable. Which of the two choices would work better for me? Two tuners is plenty if that helps. But is there something in the 3 tuner version which would be better for my particular situation? Would like to be able to use either the PC or the Mac and well as be able to view TV on my iPad (not necessarily all at the same time). Thanks.



I would definitely recommend the three tuner prime as just about every channel requires decryption here in Virginia (also Comcast). I do not believe you will be able to decrypt premium content on the Mac, however. You can use Remote Potato to stream from Windows Media Center to phones/tablets (with likely varying degrees of success).

calculon68


quality posts: 0 Private Messages calculon68
shortbus2 wrote:
For those looking to run this over WiFi? You must have N capable devices for that to work reliably. A standard HD OTA stream is 14-20Mbps depending on the audio and video encoding. A WiFi network running G (54Mbps) in perfect conditions tops out around 22Mbps of actual throughput. My laptop could not smoothly play most streams until I upgraded to a N150 router.



Even with a N-Router, I was never able to get *consistent and reliable* playback of HDHomeRun OTA recordings. If wi-fi is your only connectivity option- I'd pass on the Silicon Dust. (and I've loved my HDHomeRun for over two years)

Powerline AV is the better solution to get Home network streams to play consistently. My appliance is hooked up to my Roku, BD-Player and A/V reciever- and it solved all my wi-fi playback issues.

gallogj


quality posts: 1 Private Messages gallogj

I currently have a thumbstick tv tuner attached to my pc and use WMC to record any shows that I like. I then use plex to watch those recorded shows on my roku. Will this do something for me that I don't already have? I'm thinking of getting it just for that other tuner...so I could watch a show on the hub pc while it records my other shows.

cycokiller


quality posts: 6 Private Messages cycokiller

Oh man, these are a good deal. I have been running one of the original (white) dual-tuner models since May of 2009. I paid $160 (on sale) for that one, and I'm still using it today. I've streamed to Windows and Linux systems using the SD software as well as WMC, MythTV, VLC and others. I've never had any problems.

I don't have cable, and don't plan to have it any time in the future, so I'm just working with the ATSC units. But as far as they go, I am happy to recommend them to anyone (and I have, to many folks over the past 4+ years).

I ordered two of the dual-tuner units today. I'll probably throw a second on the network to give me a total of 4 so I can record & watch more stuff at the same time. The other one will go in the storage room so I have a spare in case one dies or they stop making these wonderful little tools of couch potatory.

4F682120446F6E277420746F756368206D652074686572652100

ctoddrun


quality posts: 0 Private Messages ctoddrun
spryguy wrote:It seems that the EyeTV software will only work with the Prime (3-tuner) on a Windows 7 machine. So, if you have a Mac OSX the two-tuner is pretty much the way to go.

Link with much of the dirty details.
http://forums.macrumors.com/showthread.php?t=1306119



Have one - love it - works GREAT on my Mac via EyeTv. Of course, EyeTv is not free - I also have a USB tuner "card" that came with the EyeTv software...

chakolate


quality posts: 2 Private Messages chakolate

How does this hook up? I have only one input on my router - do I put this in between my modem and the router? IOW, do I take the output from the modem (is that what you call it when it's DSL? I get a little confuzzled sometimes) and make that the input to the tuner, then take the output of that and make it the input to the router?

chakolate


quality posts: 2 Private Messages chakolate
chakolate wrote:How does this hook up? I have only one input on my router - do I put this in between my modem and the router? IOW, do I take the output from the modem (is that what you call it when it's DSL? I get a little confuzzled sometimes) and make that the input to the tuner, then take the output of that and make it the input to the router?



If anyone is still reading, I'd still like an answer to this, for future reference. You can email me, too, at [mod - email removed to prevent naughty spammers] Thanks.

bdy0003


quality posts: 0 Private Messages bdy0003

I assume you're asking about Dual. You connect this unit to your router via ethernet, coax cable from the unit to your antenna, and lastly ac to the wall (power source). As you can see, the modem does not factor into the connection.

chakolate wrote:If anyone is still reading, I'd still like an answer to this, for future reference. You can email me, too, at [mod - email removed to prevent naughty spammers] Thanks.